Ronald Nored Is A Big Hire

A happy man

A happy man

One of Brad Stevens’ first hires as head coach of the Celtics was Ronald Nored, which says a lot about the former Butler point guard. It’s not like someone else was going to steal him away, Stevens just wanted Nored around as soon as possible. With one of Stevens’ primary goals being to create a nice environment to work in, bringing in Nored so quick speaks very highly of him and who he is as a person.

One could say that it’s no big deal; he won’t even be an assistant coach. He will have a role with player development and will most likely be more around Maine than Boston. However, don’t let this make you overlook Nored, because sooner rather than later he could have a bigger role in the organization.

Ronald Nored was born in 1990, which makes him way too young at 23. At that age he should be playing basketball, not watching from the sidelines. But, for Nored, coaching is just so much better than playing. He prefers coaching because he lives to help other people in any way he can. “I enjoy being around other people,” Nored confesses. “I don’t enjoy sitting around watching T.V, or enjoy sitting and looking at Facebook. I enjoy interacting with people.”

There are two things he strives for he says: serving God and serving the people.  “I just like doing my best to find any way that I can make anyone else better, lift others up in any situation,” Nored says. That sounds perfect for the role the Celtics and Stevens have assigned to him, at least for his first season in Boston. Nored will probably be the guy working with Avery and Rondo a whole lot, talking them up and always telling them what they can do better and what they’re doing great. He will be around Kelly and Jared plenty of time too, letting them know how to improve their games. The important thing is that Nored will be doing that because he cares. “He is what he is, and he’s very nice, and caring, and he’s so good with young people” Nored’s mom says. I think he could care less about the money he’s earning.

His dad, Ronald E. Nored Sr, passed away in 2003, leaving Nored with a void in his life that he soon learned how to fill: by helping others. Nored uses his father’s legacy as inspiration. “I’ve found celebration in his life. He lived life for other people and lived the right way. I promise I’m just trying to do half of what he did.” Nored says the way he lives is a reflection of the way his dad lived his life. As a minister of the church, Nored’s father was always helping other people. That is all Nored wants to do in his life, and right now he’s in a perfect position to do it.

Nored has an elementary education major. He found that a great way to help was from the beginning of a person’s life. As he was in Butler, he was a teacher too, and his kids loved him. One big reason was, of course, him being a basketball player. The other, and the most important one, he just knew how to communicate.

“I think Ronald has a future in whatever he wants to do,” fellow elementary teacher Sheryl Seabrook says, “He’s a very dedicated young man.” What Ronald Nored wants to do in his life is help other people, preferably through basketball.

Nored knows what will be the key to achieve his goal: “I have to make sure I’m practicing what I’m teaching and my attitude is in the right place.”

The Celtics should be very glad Brad Stevens brought this 23 year old to the organization. With him, I get the sense that he will be that guy no one ever notices, the guy always in the back-stage, but the guy essential for the production to go through and if he’s absent everything falls apart.

The Celtics have a lot of young players now, and they have the perfect guy to help them develop into the best they can be. Ronald Nored will be in the back-stage, but his effects will show on the scene, on the parquet floor.

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One thought on “Ronald Nored Is A Big Hire

  1. Makes me feel pretty under-accomplished, kids three years younger than me and has a job I could only dream of. pshh.

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